Detail

Title ID 2254Collection ID184
TitleThe Lucrative Art of Hand Tweaked Glass
Date1974
CollectionAlbany Cine Club
Genre/TypeAmateurCine/Video clubFictionDocu-Drama
ThemeCine Club Film-making
KeywordsAccidents Houses Industry Men Performing Arts
Location
LocalSouthwick
RegionalWest Sussex
NationalEngland United Kingdom
Credits
ProductionAlbany Productions Film Unit
FormatColour Sound
Duration4 min. 20 sec.
Copyright & AccessCopyright restrictions apply, contact Screen Archive South East for details

Summary

A mock-documentary, produced by Albany Productions Film Unit in 1974, about "hand-tweaking" glass bottles. Two "tweakers" steal milk bottles and attempt to make "smoked" and "frosted" glasses to be exported all over the world...

Description

In order to pursue this ancient craft, raw material needs to be collected 'with great diligence and zeal and long arms...'. A woman leaves an empty milk bottle on the front step of her house, to be collected by the milkman, when a man takes it away, 'transporting it to centres where the material can be processed.' Two men meet each other, but run away when a milk float appears. 'Now floats are used to collect vast quantities,' explains the narrator. A 'collector' stumbles upon a stash, 'thought to be assembled during the early tweakers period'. The two men are seen inside a garden shed, full of a vast array of bottles in different colours and sizes. According to the narrator, 'the operate with a dexterity born of long practice', but the two men make a hash of their work, shattering the glass bottle after turning it. The craft is not without it's dangers, explains the narrator, 'but new research has enabled shattered glass to be reassembled.' Glass on the floor is magically re-formed into a complete glass bottle, using a camera trick (reverse action). The two men finally manage to 'tweak' the glass bottle, successfully breaking the bottle top and neck from the base before placing in the freezer. 'Frosted glass is produced mainly for export to Iceland,' explains the narrator. The "hand-tweakers" hold the glasses over a smoker to create 'smoked glass' effects, coating the glasses in black carbon. 'Every glass must carry a health warning,' explains the narrator. A glassware business has opened a new showroom, where 'a customer is expected.' The End.